City Light Acquires More Fish Habitat for Preservation

Seattle City Light recently purchased three separate riverfront properties to protect salmonid habitat in our region. The purchases cover 44.5 acres on Pressentin Creek, one acre on the Skagit River and half an acre on the Tolt River. The property on the Skagit River is adjacent to other protected parcels owned by City Light.

Seattle City Light recently purchased three separate riverfront properties to protect salmonid habitat in our region. The purchases cover 44.5 acres on Pressentin Creek, one acre on the Skagit River and half an acre on the Tolt River. The property on the Skagit River is adjacent to other protected parcels owned by City Light.

The Pressentin Creek property Seattle City Light acquired contains important fish and wildlife habitat, especially old-growth forest.

The Pressentin Creek property Seattle City Light acquired contains important fish and wildlife habitat, especially old-growth forest.

The habitat purchases were paid for through City Light’s Endangered Species Act Early Action Program. This program allows for the conservation of habitat for endangered or threatened species. It is important to preserve Washington State’s salmonid habitat to ensure the health and stability of protected populations of salmon, bull trout and other salmonid species in our area. City Light’s total holdings of land under this program are now 2,820 acres.

“Seattle City Light shares the watersheds and rivers that support our hydroelectric dams with many fish and wildlife species,” General Manager and CEO Jorge Carrasco said. “As the nation’s greenest utility, our commitment is to be a good steward of those environments while we produce clean, affordable, renewable energy.”

More information about City Light’s fish and wildlife programs is available here.  Past accomplishments include the installation of fish-friendly bridges near hydroelectric dams, contribution to habitat restoration projects, and the creation of specially-designed structures that keep fish out of the dams.  The utility also actively manages river-flow levels to protect salmon and steelhead eggs and juvenile fish from too much or too little water.  City Light has successfully contributed to the health of native salmon species on the Skagit River and is actively working to protect and improve habitat in all of its holdings.

City Light’s 2013 Environment Report can be read here.