Keep cool and cook on! Summer grilling ideas that won’t heat up your home  

Nathan MacDonald is a Senior Public Relations Specialist with Seattle City Light. He is a busy dad of twins, is obsessed with eating and making Texas barbecue and loves to cook using unique methods and gadgets. 

When you think of a summertime cookout, electricity probably isn’t the first thing that comes to mind. While gas and charcoal may be more traditional methods of cooking outdoors, there are other ways that include using renewable electricity. Join City Light’s Senior Public Relations Specialist and self-proclaimed barbecue fanatic, Nathan MacDonald, as he takes us on a journey of staying cool with cooking with electricity. 

Like many residents in our area, I live in an apartment that doesn’t allow charcoal or gas grills and using my stove or oven on a hot August day turns my place into a sauna. I needed to find an option to cooking out that would be safe, fun, and wouldn‘t heat up my apartment. After researching the available alternatives to propane and charcoal, I settled on an electric grill for outdoor use that fits perfectly on my patio and requires only a standard three-pronged outlet.  

At first, I was a little skeptical. I wondered how it would measure up to the charcoal grills I had used previously. I was also curious how it would affect my electricity bill. But after grilling my first batch of burgers at about the same time as a conventional grill, I was hooked. From the efficient cooking to those oh-so-important grill marks, it was an excellent investment. The best part? My specific grill model only costs roughly 17 cents to operate for an hour of grilling on full heat.   

Since acquiring my grill, I’ve added to my collection of electric cooking tools. Air fryers, electric pressure cookers, sous vide circulators, and many other options exist on the market to help you electrify your kitchens. This summer, try some of your own unique cooking methods that keep your home cool and your energy costs low.